Into the blue holes!

blue-holes

The most remarkable thing about trekking through the bush in The Bahamas is jumping into a random blue hole.

Being in the pine barrens for hours, under the blazing Bahamian sun will give you enough of an incentive to want to jump into one of these mysterious and inviting natural phenomenons. You needn’t endure the foliage to see them all, as a few of them are situated in-land and are accessible by car.

Blue holes are structures of legend and folklore for Bahamians; with tales of the Lusca – a mythical creature that drags unsuspecting swimmers to the bottom, there is an adventure to get to, beautiful to look at and refreshing to swim in.

Now, I can’t say whether or not the Lusca exists – the jury is out on that one – rather I’d say get out and see for yourself! So let’s explore three blue holes in The Bahamas, shall we?

Dean’s Blue Hole – Long Island 

This is one of the most accessible blue holes in The Bahamas, and also the second deepest discovered to date. Word to Andre Musgrove who took the famous picture at the depths of this water-filled peephole into the core of the earth. From the air, you will miss it on your descent but there is no shortage of signage on the island directing you to this marvel of Long Island’s topography. The drive isn’t too long from Deadman’s Cay, and it isn’t particularly exciting either until you bank the corner off the paved road into the quarry path and arrive at the edge of the blue hole. 

The sheer cliff before you is exactly what you want to walk towards. Head to the top, and you’ll find a random chair that someone thought to bring so you can sit and contemplate doing (or not doing) what I am going to say next. 

Jump. 

That’s the best way to experience this natural wonder. You’ve got to take the jump and watch the blue hole’s pupil glare at you as gravity bears down on you, hurtling you toward the depths. I mean, if you are afraid of heights you can also just walk into it and swim out to the platform in the middle of Dean’s, if you want to be one in the group with the weakest selfie game then this choice is for you. 

Sapphire – Eleuthera 

Not even 10 minutes away from the famous Preacher’s Cave is the Sapphire Blue Hole. Now, this is a bit of a tricky one because getting in it is easy, but getting out will require a little upper body strength or at the least one of your friends on the ledge above. Unlike Dean’s Blue Hole, you can’t swim to the edge of Sapphire and walk out. Don’t let that frighten you, you’re still going to jump into it, because that’s what you came here to do, right?

There isn’t much in terms of surroundings although you can pilfer a few mangoes and oranges from the nearby abandoned citrus groves depending on what time of the year you arrive on the Freedom Isle. This is purely about the experience. Looking down into the darkness of Dean’s Blue Hole can be a bit frightening, but you should ABSOLUTELY plunge into Sapphire with a mask and check out the shelves along Sapphire’s wall and the underwater rock formations. You may also spot a couple of School Master’s (there are fish, not to be confused with Mr Belding). 

Now, getting out of Sapphire requires a rope climb unless some benevolent explorer has replaced the rickety ladder that seemed to have grown into the rock and broken apart when I was there a few months ago. 

Either way, go and visit this blue hole and jump in it! 

Treasure Cay Blue Hole – Treasure Cay, Abaco 

blue-holes

Smack in the middle of Treasure Cay – which by the way has one of the most beautiful beaches lined with some of the softest white sand you can sink your toes into – is the Treasure Cay Blue Hole. This is one that I like to call a dead blue hole because there is no marine life near the surface but it’s a beautiful one to discover. 

If you’ve got some diving gear (if you aren’t certified, please don’t try this) take a swim down and see if you can find the halocline which in this blue hole is at a relatively shallow depth. This is where the freshwater, and saltwater meet and it causes a blurry partition that you simply can’t appreciate from the surface. 

There’s no shortage of blue holes in The Bahamas to explore. Perhaps on an adventure hike, you’ll discover a blue hole of your own! Please, do so safely, and with respect for the environment.

Keep exploring, you may discover a blue hole of your own! I can’t promise that it will be named after you, but you can tell people it is, which is practically the same thing. For more reasons to hop on a plane and visit The Bahamas, check this article out! 

Explore the blue holes, and Explore The Bahamas. Follow us on Instagram for the most virtual travel pictures in The Caribbean!

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